Video and audio resources
Christmas Bundle Sale
Teaching Series

From the Cross to Crown Blog

  1. We Call Each Other to Worship Jesus

    by
    Comment

    The final post from Troy McLaughlin (part 1 | part 2)…

    ID-100158195

    Yea, Lord, we greet thee, born this happy morning; Jesus, to thee be glory given!

    The Lordship and incarnation of the Son, as well as the resulting joy among men, are reiterated here. As before, emphasized is the general glorification of God in the specific glorification of His Son. To use an archery analogy, to say that the purpose of all creation is to glorify God hits the hay bale, but to say that the purpose of all creation is to exalt Jesus Christ hits the bull’s eye. Paul makes this clear in his letter to the Colossians when he writes, “He is the image of the invisible God, the firstborn of all creation. For by Him all things were created, both in the heavens and on earth, visible and invisible, whether thrones or dominions or rulers or authorities—all things have been created through Him and for Him. He is before all things, and in Him all things hold together. He is also head of the body, the church; and He is the beginning, the firstborn from the dead, so that He Himself will come to have first place in everything.”

    Word of the Father, now in flesh appearing!

    Finally, our attention is drawn to that great riddle found in the opening lines of John’s gospel: “In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. He was in the beginning with God. All things came into being through Him, and apart from Him nothing came into being that has come into being. In Him was life, and the life was the Light of men. The Light shines in the darkness, and the darkness did not comprehend it.” There is but one answer that satisfies every element of this riddle, and that answer is Jesus Christ, God in the flesh. The incarnation of the Son ushers in the fulfillment of God’s glorious salvation promises, and the wonder of Immanuel demands, above all, the following response:

    O come, let us adore Him

    O come, let us adore Him

    O come, let us adore Him

    Christ the Lord

    This beautiful hymn is the quintessential call to worship, because it is a call to worship. But the song itself does not call. Rather, the faithful call out to the faithful, exclaiming, “Let us adore Him.” May we then not only heed this call but, in our singing, eagerly join in its proclamation, calling one another to worship Jesus… at Christmas and always.

     

    [Photo credit: FreeDigitalPhotos.net, franky242]

  2. O Come Let Us Adore Him

    by
    Comment

    Continued from this post by guest blogger Troy McLaughlin…

    ID-10022366

    The initial “O come, all ye faithful” has but three goals in mind: adore Him, adore Him, and adore Him.

    Today, the meaning of this word, “adore,” has been watered down such that professional athletes and musicians are “adored” by fans, and young children are frequently described as “adorable.” But make no mistake, the word’s meaning conveys worship, which involves “worth-ship.” And there is but One to whom all worship is to be directed. There is but One who is worthy. And it is not only our Christian duty but our gracious privilege to practice that which will engage us for eternity: the lifting of praises up to the throne upon whom sits the One worthy of worship: Christ the Lord. The pairing of these titles is of no little consequence, for they remind us that Jesus is not only humble Savior but holy Sovereign. He has come as God’s Lamb but will return as Judah’s Lion. To emphasize His sacrifice at the expense of His sovereignty is to embrace the blessing while disregarding the position of the Blessor; ultimately, a self-exalting practice. The calling, therefore, is clear: to adore Him not as we prefer to see Him but as He really is: Christ the Lord!

    Sing, choirs of angels, sing in exultation, sing, all ye citizens of Heaven above!

    The call to worship is extended to those who exist primarily in the spiritual realm. The angels are called to sing for the same purpose and in the same way: “in exultation,” which means “triumphant joy.” And what is their song?

    Glory to God in the highest

    This lyrical pronouncement is fulfilled by nothing other than the worship of God the Son, the Lord Jesus Christ, as the refrain reminds:

    O come, let us adore Him

    O come, let us adore Him

    O come, let us adore Him

    Christ the Lord

     

     

    [Photo credit: FreeDigitalPhotos.net, nuttakit]

  3. The Best Christmas Song: A Call to Worship Jesus

    by
    Comment

    Guest post by Troy McLaughlin…

    I am a lover of Christmas songs. So much so that when I attempt to prohibit Christmas songs in our home until after Thanksgiving (out of respect for Thanksgiving), I am usually the first to violate the prohibition. Timeless hymns, classic carols, modern tunes. The kind of Christmas song makes little difference. I am easily (and often literally) swayed by the hypnotic familiarity of the melody. But my favorite songs are those which supply not only a pleasing sound but a meaningful message. A true message. Which is why the hymn, “O Come All Ye Faithful,” continues to reside at the top of my list. And which is why I hope to persuade you to put it near the top of yours…

     O come, all ye faithful, joyful and triumphant! O come ye, O come ye to Bethlehem

    The song begins with a call to the “faithful,” those whose faith and hope is in the gospel, to draw near to where Jesus is, so as to be near to Jesus Himself. Nothing should be more natural for a believer, for it is through Jesus alone that we are able to draw near to God at all, as Paul writes to the Ephesians, explaining that his gospel ministry “was in accordance with the eternal purpose which God carried out in Christ Jesus our Lord, in whom we have boldness and confident access through faith in Him.” If you are rightly counted among the faithful, then do not hesitate to heed the song’s exhortation: “Come!” And do so with joy and triumph. The apostle Paul affirms this joy in His letters, especially to the Philippians, wherein he repeatedly urges believers to rejoice in the Lord Jesus Christ, the basis of our sure salvation. Paul affirms also a triumphant approach. In one of his letters to the Corinthians, he confidently proclaims, “Thanks be to God, who always leads us in triumph in Christ, and manifests through us the sweet aroma of the knowledge of Him in every place.” And to the Colossians he writes, “When you were dead in your transgressions and the uncircumcision of your flesh, He made you alive together with Him, having forgiven us all our transgressions, having canceled out the certificate of debt consisting of decrees against us, which was hostile to us; and He has taken it out of the way, having nailed it to the cross. When He had disarmed the rulers and authorities, He made a public display of them, having triumphed over them through Him.” In the gospel of Jesus Christ, there is unparalleled cause for rejoicing and for triumph. Therefore, let us enter into His presence and in such a way.

    Sira Anamwong, FreeDigitalPhotos.netCome and behold him

    We are then called to do that which Mary did and Martha did not: abide in the presence of Jesus, beholding all that He does, all that He says, all that He is. May our good Christian service never distract us from the perfect object of that service. May our means of worship never supplant its infinitely more glorious end. May Jesus alone and forever be the One we behold!

    Born the King of Angels

    Here, the song introduces the incarnation of God the Son, reminding us that, even in the flesh, there is no created realm that falls outside His jurisdiction. His kingdom encompasses all, as Paul so clearly expresses to the Ephesians: God “seated Him at His right hand in the heavenly places, far above all rule and authority and power and dominion, and every name that is named, not only in this age but also in the one to come. And He put all things in subjection under His feet, and gave Him as head over all things to the church, which is His body, the fullness of Him who fills all in all.” The author of Hebrews further emphasizes Christ’s dominion over the spiritual realm: “When He had made purification of sins, He sat down at the right hand of the Majesty on high, having become as much better than the angels, as He has inherited a more excellent name than they. For to which of the angels did God ever say, “You are My Son, Today I have begotten You”? And again, “I will be a Father to Him and He shall be a Son to Me”? And when He again brings the firstborn into the world, He says, and let all the angels of God worship Him.””

    And then the refrain (which I will discuss in the next post)…

    O come, let us adore Him

    O come, let us adore Him

    O come, let us adore Him

    Christ the Lord

     

    [Photo credit: Sira Anamwong, FreeDigitalPhotos.net]

  4. A FREE Book Is Just a Survey Away

    by
    2

    ID-100144436

    FreeDigitalPhotos.net By Stuart Miles

     

    Below is a link to the latest Cross to Crown newsletter. Included is a survey that will help us plan more effectively in spreading the Christ-honoring truths of New Covenant Theology. If you haven’t already, please read the newsletter and take the survey. As thanks, we are giving away free books from John Reisinger.

    And please tell someone else about it!

    http://eepurl.com/-env9

     

     

  5. Sound of Grace/New Covenant Media…Welcome!

    by
    Comment

    sog-ncm-logo

    If you were looking for Sound of Grace or New Covenant Media, you’re not lost. Those ministries (and websites) are now part of Cross to Crown Ministries. You can read more about the merger here.

    If you are looking to purchase books from John G. Reisinger, Blake White, or other New Covenant Media authors, you can do so from our store. And now is a great time because every title is UNDER $10 with FREE shipping!

    Check back here often (or follow us on Facebook and Twitter) for updates on continuing resources and archives of Sound of Grace and Bunyan Conference media.

     

     

Listen for Free!

Why Cross to Crown?

Why Cross to Crown?